The Latest

Sep 19, 2014 / 4 notes

Haitus!

Well ladies and gents the time has come for me under go surgery for my other hand (minor stuff) which means I’ll be afk for a bit! So please do not take it personal if I’m unable to respond to notes/post etc. Its not that I’m ignoring you its just my mouse hand has gone on prolonged vacation XD

So until next time, stay warm and have a lovely autumn!! =D

Sep 18, 2014 / 343,507 notes

thisisnotlatinx:

I love my skin!

This is amazing wow
-m

(via weshallflyaway)

usnatarchives:

Seventy years ago this week, Minnie Spotted Wolf became the first Native American woman to enlist in the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve.
Born and raised on a ranch near White Tail Creek, about 15 miles from Heart Butte, Montana, Spotted Wolf stated that growing up doing such ranch work as “cutting fence posts, driving a two-ton truck, and breaking horses” seemed to prepare her for the rigors of Marine Corps boot camp, which she was quoted as saying was “hard, but not too hard.”
This service picture of Minnie Spotted Wolf is from the correspondence files from the Blackfeet Indian Agency (Record Group 75) in the National Archives at Denver, where you can find the photographs of many other Blackfeet who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during WWII.
Image: Minnie Spotted Wolf, Record Group 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, ARC 7329402
Sep 17, 2014 / 2,304 notes

usnatarchives:

Seventy years ago this week, Minnie Spotted Wolf became the first Native American woman to enlist in the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve.

Born and raised on a ranch near White Tail Creek, about 15 miles from Heart Butte, Montana, Spotted Wolf stated that growing up doing such ranch work as “cutting fence posts, driving a two-ton truck, and breaking horses” seemed to prepare her for the rigors of Marine Corps boot camp, which she was quoted as saying was “hard, but not too hard.”

This service picture of Minnie Spotted Wolf is from the correspondence files from the Blackfeet Indian Agency (Record Group 75) in the National Archives at Denver, where you can find the photographs of many other Blackfeet who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during WWII.

Image: Minnie Spotted Wolf, Record Group 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, ARC 7329402

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

carapace-cowl:

 
nativefaces:
CULTURAL GENOCIDE:  Before and After photo of a young Cree boy, forced to attend a Canadian “Indian school.” (1910)
Sep 16, 2014 / 18,843 notes

carapace-cowl:

 

nativefaces:

CULTURAL GENOCIDE:  Before and After photo of a young Cree boy, forced to attend a Canadian “Indian school.” (1910)

(via weshallflyaway)

Sep 16, 2014 / 88,973 notes

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.

Links:

Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart

Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story

You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

(via weshallflyaway)

Sep 15, 2014 / 43,867 notes
Sep 14, 2014 / 1,394 notes

La Jaguarina: Queen of the Sword (1859 or 1864-?)

rejectedprincesses:

image

In April 1896, hardened military veteran US Sergeant Charles Walsh, in front of a crowd of 4,000 onlookers, turned tail and ran. Mere minutes earlier, during a round of equestrian fencing, he’d been hit so hard he’d been nearly knocked off his horse – so hard that his opponent’s sword was permanently bent backwards in a U shape. In response, Walsh did the honorable thing: jumped from his horse, claimed that the judge was cheating, and fled the scene, to the jeers of the massive crowd.

His opponent? A woman known as La Jaguarina, Queen of Swords – an undefeated sword master who later retired only because she ran out of people to fight. Had she born 25 years later, according to the US Fencing Fall of Fame, she might be recognized as “the world’s first great woman fencer.” This week we tell the tale of this largely-forgotten heroine.

Read More

Sep 14, 2014 / 241,767 notes

(via strangelykt)

octoberyet:

Perna Studios Halloween sketch card by Mick & Matt Glebe
Sep 14, 2014 / 32 notes

octoberyet:

Perna Studios Halloween sketch card by Mick & Matt Glebe

Sep 14, 2014 / 1,575 notes

oupacademic:

Fractals

Are fractals simple or complicated objects? Or perhaps both?  The beauty and attraction of many fractals stems from their complex and intricate form, with ever more detail becoming apparent under increasing magnification. Yet many fractals depend on a very simple rule, applied over and over again, a process called iteration.

The Mandelbrot set is perhaps the best known example. It is completely determined by the very simple formula  z2 + c, where z and c code points in the plane or on a computer screen in terms of ‘complex numbers’.  If, starting at 0 and repeatedly applying the formula to move from one point to the next, the sequence of points stay ‘close to home’, then c belongs to the Mandelbrot set and is coloured black in the pictures. If, on the other hand, the itinerary rapidly shoots off or ‘escapes’ into the distance, then c lies outside the Mandelbrot set and is coloured according to the rate of escape.

This simple rule is very easily programmed on a computer. Yet the Mandelbrot set is an extraordinarily complex object. It has a prominent cardioid, or heart shape, surrounded by near circular buds, which in turn have smaller buds attached to them. On closer inspection, stars, spirals and sea horses become apparent. Joined to these are many fine hairs on which lie miniature copies of the Mandelbrot set itself, and increased magnification reveals an endless gallery of ever more exotic features.

For its appearance alone, the Mandelbrot set would merely be a fascinating curiosity. But in recent years its remarkable mathematical properties have become enormously significant. Naturally associated with each point c of the Mandelbrot set is another fractal, called a Julia set. If c is in the main cardioid, then the Julia set is a closed loop, if c is in the largest bud, then it is formed by infinitely many loops, meeting systematically in pairs, and so on.  Moreover, the Mandelbrot set is ‘universal’ in that it codes the behaviour of iteration by many formulae other than just z2 + c.

Kenneth Falconer is a mathematician who specializes in Fractal Geometry and related topics. He is author of Fractals: A Very Short Introduction.

Images courtesy of Kenneth Falconer.

Oh Fractals! Its like the (not so) secret language of the universe…Well in my entirely ignorant opinion anyways ^^;

(via themoonmothwrites)